Keynotes

Keynotes

Andrew Taberner

Optical sensing in bio-instrumentation

Christl Lauterbach

SensFloor®: Human movement tracking and interactive environments

Ying-En Ge

A review of promotion of shore power as an option of reduction in shipping emissions

Sreeraman Rajan

Sensing in the IoT Era

Antoni Martínez Ballesté

Cybersecurity in IoT: devices, people and society

Luis Bravo Martins

How Mixed Reality is transforming industrial maintenance & field service

Christl Lauterbach

Managing Director Future-Shape GmbH Email: Christl.Lauterbach@Future-Shape.com

SensFloor®: Human movement tracking and interactive environments

The described sensor floor is a textile-based large-area sensor system, which is installed as an underlay beneath the flooring. It detects people moving across the floor, calculates their trajectories and distinguishes between foot steps and a fall. The use of capacitive proximity sensing instead of pressure sensing gives high flexibility in floor design: even non-elastic flooring, like laminate parquet or tiles are suitable. The installed system is invisible and unobtrusive compared to camera systems.

The SensFloor system enables a variety of different applications in the domain of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) like fall detection, activity monitoring, energy savings, control of automatic doors, intrusion alarm and access control.

Presence detection and human movement tracking provide valuable data for Internet of Things (IoT) scenarios like i.e. behavioral analysis in retail, workspace, living or healthcare. For example, it allows care organizations to optimize their workflows and improve quality of care.

In future, Artificial Intelligence will provide means to evaluate the health status of people walking on the floor. The proposed processing scheme is able to extract behavioral information from the sensor data, which is fed into a learning algorithm that internally represents typical patterns, and outputs a measure for the divergence of current behavior from typical behavior.

Gait pattern analysis by SensFloor provides objective data for medical diagnosis by medical experts like neurologists or physiotherapists.  Gait parameters like walking speed, step length, and straightness are important factors for the health status of patients.

In retail scenarios the sensor floor counts number of customers, depicts traffic patterns, reports queues and sup.ports the optimization of the shop design

Short Biography

Christl Lauterbach founded the Future-Shape GmbH, Germany in 2005 and is Managing Director since then. Main product of Future-Shape is SensFloor, a large-area sensor floor. From 1999 until 2005 she was at Infineon Technologies AG, Corporate Research, Senior Staff Engineer for Emerging Technologies, and Project Manager for Smart Textiles. Before that, she worked 22 years at Siemens AG, Corporate Research and Technology, as a developer for Semiconductor Technology and Circuit Design. Education: Assistance Degree in Electrical/Communication Engineering. She has more than 200 patents and patent pending, and >120 scientific publications.

Email: Christl.Lauterbach@Future-Shape.com

Prof. Sreeraman Rajan

Department of Systems and Computer Engineering in Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada

Sensing in the IoT Era

The concept of sensors, instrumentation and measurement, signal and image processing is undergoing many changes due to the advent of IoT.  The idea of “whatever can be measured”, “wherever can be measured,” “whenever can be measured” has challenged the researchers to  re-examine how sensing is done, sensed data is managed and  information is extracted.  IoT demands the sensors to be cheaper so that they can be easily deployed, be physically “small” and unobstrusive, be wireless and communicate “on demand” and “at will”, consume less power (“green”), preprocess the data before communicating, self identify and self validate, self calibrate and, be fault tolerant.  Sensing smartly becomes crucial in this IoT Era.  IoT also demands that there be “intelligence” at sensing, communicating and processing levels.  Important issues from the signal processing perspective include quantity and quality of sensed data.  Quality is dependent on the type of sensing (contact or non-contact) while quantity may be attributed to ubiquitous nature of sensing.  Quantity and quality of sensed data affect the extraction and interpretation of information.  When processing is outsourced, issues of privacy and security also need to be addressed.

Short Biography

Prof. Sreeraman Rajan is a Canada Research Chair in Sensor Systems in the Department of Systems and Computer Engineering in Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada since 2015. He is also currently the Associate Director, Ottawa Carleton Institute for Biomedical Engineering.  Before joining Carleton University, he was with Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) Ottawa, Canada as a Senior Defence Scientist.  He has worked in the areas of nuclear science and engineering, control, electronic warfare, communication and biomedical engineering while in industry.   He is currently the Chair of the IEEE Ottawa EMBS and AESS Chapters.  He has served IEEE Canada as its board member (2010-Oct 2018) and the IEEE MGA in its Admissions and Advancement Committee, Strategic and Environment Assessment Committee.  He was awarded the IEEE MGA Achievement Award in 2012 and recognized for his IEEE contributions with Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012. IEEE Canada recognized his outstanding service through 2016 W.S.  Read Outstanding Service Award.  IEEE Ottawa Section recognized him as an Outstanding Volunteer in 2012 and an Outstanding Engineer in 2018.  He has been involved in organizing several successful IEEE conferences and has been a reviewer for several IEEE journals and conferences.  He is the holder of two patents and two disclosures of invention. He has authored more than 150 journal articles and conference papers. He is a Senior Member of IEEE, a member of IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement, Engineering in Medicine and Biology, Signal Processing and Aerospace and Electronic Systems Societies.

Prof. Dr. Ying-En Ge

College of Transport & Communications Chair, Lloyd's Register Foundation International Institute for Transport and Environment Shanghai Maritime University

A review of promotion of shore power as an option of reduction in shipping emissions

It has been almost 20 years since Sweden installed the first commercial shore power in 2000. Although there are many ports and ships installed shore power (also known as cold ironing) nowadays, only a few of ships plug in cold ironing when they berth at the port because of various issues. The previous papers mainly focus on the safety, evaluation and cost benefits of installing shore power. This paper presents a detailed review of the existing literature on shower power use/promotion, including general statistics, factors, methodology and results of sub-fields. One key finding is that the emission evaluation, cost and cost-benefits with a top-down approach are the first three most-discussed themes in the transportation research. Besides, the characteristics, feasibility and how to improve the technology of show power have been paid a great attention in the electronic engineering literature. Emerging directions in this field include making a questionnaire survey to know the willing and attitude of all stakeholders, the influences of different emission factors to the benefits of cold ironing and balancing the cost-benefit of cold ironing among all the stakeholders properly or making a method to decide who may be the best or most suitable shareholder to finance the costly system.

Short Biography

Dr. Ge, since December 2013, has been Professor and Dean of the College of Transport & Communications at the Shanghai Maritime University (SMU), China. He was awarded his PhD degree in Tongji University in 1999 in Shanghai. Before joining the Dalian University of Technology (DUT) in the Spring of 2010 as a professor, he was first Research Assistant at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, then postdoctoral fellow at the University of California at Davis (2000 – 2001) and subsequently research fellow in The University of Ulster (2001 – 2003), The Queen’s University of Belfast (2003 – 2006) and Edinburgh Napier University (2007 – 2008); he worked in transport consulting arena in 2008-2010.

His primary academic interests include transportation network analysis, demand management, transportation policy & the environment, and operations and management of ports & shipping. His publications appear in Transportation Science, Transportation Research Parts B & D, Networks and Spatial Economics, as so on. Over the years he also served as the Executive Chair of the 6th International Symposium on Travel Demand Management (TDM2013), the Chair of the Organizing Committee of the 6th Transportation Research Forum (Shanghai, 2015), and the 16th COTA International Conference of Transportation Professionals (CICTP2016). He is also the chair of the Waterborne Transport division of the World Transport Convention, which takes place every year in Beijing since 2017.

Prof. Dr. Antoni Martínez Ballesté

SMART* research group Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain

Cybersecurity in IoT: devices, people and society

The Internet of Things (IoT) is becoming a reality. Gadgets and devices connected to the Internet are providing humankind with a variety of added value services, everywhere. Two decades ago, with the globalization of the Internet, users took care of installing antivirus software so as to protect their computers and their data. With the current approach to the IoT concept and the use of the cloud, new security threats appear, and more comprehensive solutions must be considered. In this talk we will review the most relevant security problems for IoT and their countermeasures. Moreover, we will review several guidelines and codes of practice intended to secure IoT devices and networks.

Short Biography

Antoni Martínez-Ballesté (Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain). Associate professor in the Department of Computer Engineering and Mathematics in URV, since 2003. Engineer in Computer Science and Technology (URV, 2002). PhD in Telematics Engineering (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 2004). Researcher in the CRISES research group (2001-2003). Visiting junior researcher in the LAAS-CNRS (Laboratoire d’analyse et d’architecture des systèmes, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique) in Toulouse (2004). Visiting professor in Shanghai Maritime University (2018). Member of the IEEE. Researcher in the Smart Health research group in Universitat Rovira i Virgili. His research interests are electronic health (Electronic Health Records, Standards and Interoperability, Privacy in e-health, automatic acquisition of medical data and their processing, etc.), mobile health (use of smartphones, wearables and apps to improve healthcare processes and quality of life) and smart health (interaction with the smart city, smart environments and cognitive scenarios to improve healthcare processes and quality of life, using big data and deep learning techniques), as well as security and privacy in computer networks and the IoT. He has been the principal investigator in the SIMPATIC project (Intelligent System for  for Private and Autonomous Monitoring based on Information and Communications Technologies) funded by Fundació La Caixa under the Recercaixa programme. He has served as program committee member in several IEEE conferences as well as session chair. He has also served as reviewer in a number of scientific journals. Author of 88 scientific contributions, including ISI JCR journals, conference contributions and book chapters. Editor of several books on his research areas. Has taken part in 37 research and technology transfer projects, at national and international levels, in some of them as principal investigator.

Prof. Dr. Andrew Taberner

Auckland Bioengineering Institute at University of Auckland, New Zealand

Optical sensing in bioinstrumentation

Optical sensors and techniques are used widely in many areas of instrumentation and measurement. Optical sensors are often, conveniently, ‘non-contact’ and thus impose negligible disturbance of the parameter undergoing measurement. Valuable information can be represented and recorded in space, time and optical wavelength. They can provide exceptionally high spatial and/or temporal resolution, high bandwidth, and range. Moreover, optical sensors can be very inexpensive and relatively simple to use.

At the Bioinstrumentation Lab at the Auckland Bioengineering Institute, we are particularly interested in developing techniques for measuring parameters from and inside and outside the body. Such measurements help us to quantify physiological performance, detect and treat disease, and develop novel medical and scientific instruments. In making such measurements we often draw upon and develop our own optical sensing and measurement methods – from interferometry, fluorimetry and diffuse light imaging, through to area-based and volume-based optical imaging and processing techniques.

In this talk, I will overview some of the new interesting optically-based methods that we have recently developed for use in bioengineering applications. These include 1) diffuse optical imaging methods for monitoring the depth of a drug as it is rapidly injected through the skin, without requiring a needle; 2) stretchy soft optical sensors for measuring strains of up to several 100 % during movement; 3) multicamera image registration techniques for measuring the 3D shape and strain of soft tissues; 4) optical coherence tomography techniques for detecting the 3D shape of deforming muscle tissues, and 5) polarisation sensitive imaging techniques for classifying the optical and mechanical properties of biological membranes.

While these techniques sensors and techniques have been motivated by our own applications in bioengineering, the underlying principles have broad application to other areas of instrumentation and measurement.

Short Biography

Andrew Taberner is a physicist and bioengineer, and Associate Professor with the Auckland Bioengineering Institute at University of Auckland, New Zealand. From 2002-2008 he was a research scientist and co-manager of the Bioinstrumentation Laboratory at MIT (Boston). Andrew teaches Bioinstrumentation and Measurement in Biomedical Engineering. His teaching has been recognized by five “Top-teacher”
awards, and a ‘Sustained Excellence in Teaching’ award. He leads researchers in the design, construction and development of novel instruments and medical devices. He has supervised 29 PhD, 18 ME and 62 honours students. Andrew has authored more than 140 refereed scientific articles in journals and published conference proceedings, 115 conference abstracts, and published 27 issued US, European and other patents. He received the 2014 New Zealand “Innovation Excellence in Research” awards. He is the Chair of the New Zealand Chapter of the IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Society, and an editor for IEEE EMBS Pulse Magazine.

Luis Bravo Martins

Head of Marketing at NextReality

How Mixed Reality is transforming industrial maintenance & field service

Mixed Reality smartglasses are today enabling new ways to execute processes remotely, while acquiring new skill sets and increasing SLA delivery. In this talk, we will be reviewing the main use cases for Mixed Reality application in the industrial market scene and present a live demonstration of a current live project implemented in a power company.

Short Biography

Luis Bravo Martins is the author of the introductory manual “Reality has died: Live Augmented Reality!”, Is co-chair of the Portuguese chapter of VRARA (Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality Association). After a great experience as IT consultant in large companies and extended experience on startups, Luis is now Head of Marketing at NextReality, specializing in the development of Virtual and Augmented Reality, Blockchain and Chatbots solutions